Pages Menu
TwitterFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted on Jan 17, 2013

CBC Radio on Howard Gladstone

CBC Radio on Howard Gladstone

Howard Gladstone used to write about music. Now he writes songs. More importantly, he pens the kind of topical tunes that were the province of singer/songwriters before...

Read More

Posted on Dec 21, 2010

Roots and Rain – CHRY Review

Roots and Rain – CHRY Review

Reviewed by Radio York, CHRY, Toronto –
There’s nothing sweeter than a wonderfully raw voice that has a unique, laid-back, authentic and honest sound which only belongs to a singer whose music can really be felt by other people. From the minute that Howard Gladstone’s blues-inspired voice flowed into my ears, followed by a stream of Canadian folk guitar picking, I was lost and found at the same time.

Read More

Posted on Jan 21, 2010

Toronto Moon Magazine reviews Roots and Rain

Toronto Moon Magazine reviews Roots and Rain

“On Howard Gladstone’s fourth album in eight years, at least judging by the tracks from Roots and Rain that I’ve heard. I think this spiritual but often melancholy Folk and social justice balladeer has found a new groove and some fresh inspiration… His ballad “Tammy (The Wheels of Justice)” in support of a woman who was unjustly convicted of child murder based on the testimony of a discredited pathologist (included on the new disc)

Read More

Posted on Dec 21, 2009

“Alt Country” reviews Roots and Rain

“Alt Country” reviews Roots and Rain

For me, music deals with emotions. A song should touch the heart and soul of the listener. When the music is over, you should be filled with very intense feelings. “Roots and Rain” from the Canadian songwriter Howard Gladstone does this all. Just like the three earlier CD’s: “Sunflowers light the Room” (2002), “Candles on the River” (2005) and “The Breath in the Wind” (2007) this new CD excels in subtlety and relaxation.

Read More

Posted on Apr 8, 2006

Candles on the River Reviewed by Rambles

Candles on the River Reviewed by Rambles

Howard Gladstone has a particular brand of folk music that’s unlike most of what I’d call great music. Though his music is more complex than a lot of folk styles, his lyrics, his voice and the slow, flowing rhythm that is consistent all the way through the CD is basically a heart-warming melody. It’s not quite as sweet as maple syrup — more like the warm burst of a blueberry when you bite into the pancake. And no matter what your station, regardless of your fears, your failures, your hopes or awards, eating a warm blueberry pancake is a fine, large human experience.

Read More